Shrewsbury by Train

Shrewsbury by Train

Shrewsbury by Train

Shrewsbury by Train

Though the station at Castle Foregate is an uphill walk from the centre, Shrewsbury makes an excellent centre for touring by train, especially if you are keen on longer trips. London trains come from Euston via Birmingham. The Aberystwyth and Central Wales lines start here, and Chester is but a short journey away. You can get to Crewe for connections north and take the delightful cross-country route – beside some of the most interesting hill formations you will see anywhere – down the Welsh border through Ludlow and Hereford to Newport.

What about by car? First take to the hills. Shrewsbury is only 12 miles from the Welsh border with roads leading out over the English and Welsh bridges to a wide range of scenery and places you can visit within an hour’s drive. This is good walking country. South and west of Shrewsbury are the Shropshire hills and ridges, great for all kinds of walkers, while the energetic walks will be well rewarded by being able to get into the more remote areas, particularly across towards the Welsh borders. The Wrekin is a strange looking hump of a hill which rises to its elliptical peak of 1 ,335ft from which you can see twelve counties and two countries. Lots of easy little walks – Hell’s Gate is wider than Heaven’s Gate you discover; Needles Eye, Bladder Stone and Raven’s Bowl are all connected with a series of legends concerning giants. The Clee Hills are in the south. Brown Clee gets up to 1 ,800ft on the peak of Abdon Burl, with sheep and old quarry workings as well as an Iron Age earthwork. The other high peak is Clee Burf. There are views across to the Wrekin in the north and the Malverns in the south.

Long Mynd and Stretton Hills Church Stretton is the hill climbing centre and also the centre for gliders and hang gliders. There is a very good walk from Cardingmill Valley, for two miles or so, passing Light Pout waterfall and up Long Mynd. The Portway is an old track which runs for about ten miles along the length of Long Mynd. There are car parks as well for shorter walks. The Stretton Hills, the Lawley, and Caer Caradoc all have well signposted walks with Caer Caradoc, rising to 1,500ft, having the best of them all in this range.

Wenlock Edge 16 miles of hill walking out of Much Wenlock with fine wide views all round. There are parking places all along the top of the escarpment.

The Stiperstones, north of Bishop’s castle, are splintered limestone crags, 1,700ft high and ‘as rugged as any in central England,’ warns my walking handbook. There is a footpath some two miles long along the summit ridge.

The Chin Forest is to the south of The Stiperstones and Long Mynd, and south west of ‘Craven Arms’. This is border country.